Join us in celebrating women in STEM during the entire month of October!

Ada Lovelace is largely regarded as the first computer programmer, and her work and skills exemplified strength in STEM as she worked on the analytic engine, also known as an early mechanical general-purpose computer. She was also an early explorer of how society could use technology as a collaborative tool. As we celebrate Ada Lovelace Day this month, we want to raise up more influential women in STEM across the globe who are passionate about what they do.

ada_lovelace-smallAugusta Ada King-Noel, Countess of Lovelace (née Byron; 10 December 1815 – 27 November 1852) was an English mathematician and writer, chiefly known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be carried out by a machine. As a result, she is often regarded as the first computer programmer.

Her educational and social exploits brought her into contact with scientists such as Andrew Crosse, Sir David Brewster, Charles Wheatstone, Michael Faraday and the author Charles Dickens, which she used to further her education. Ada described her approach as “poetical science” and herself as an “Analyst (& Metaphysician)”.

As a teenager, her mathematical talents led her to an ongoing working relationship and friendship with fellow British mathematician Charles Babbage, also known as ‘the father of computers’, and in particular, Babbage’s work on the Analytical Engine. Lovelace first met him in June 1833, through their mutual friend, and her private tutor, Mary Somerville. Between 1842 and 1843, Ada translated an article by Italian military engineer Luigi Menabrea on the engine, which she supplemented with an elaborate set of notes, simply called Notes. These notes contain what many consider to be the first computer program—that is, an algorithm designed to be carried out by a machine. Lovelace’s notes are important in the early history of computers. She also developed a vision of the capability of computers to go beyond mere calculating or number-crunching, while many others, including Babbage himself, focused only on those capabilities. Her mind-set of “poetical science” led her to ask questions about the Analytical Engine (as shown in her notes) examining how individuals and society relate to technology as a collaborative tool.

She died of uterine cancer in 1852 at the age of 36.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_Lovelace


Malaysia Independence Day Promo

Celebrate Malaysia Independence Day with Us!

🇲🇾 SPECIAL PROMO 🇲🇾
Get a special membership rate RM250
when you sign up as Little Botz’s Member
on Independence Day.

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🇲🇾 ROBOTIC WORKSHOP 🇲🇾
Let’s defend our country and register to our Robotic Workshop as below details:

Date: 31st August 2016
Day: Wednesday
Time: 10am to 5pm
Venue: Little Botz Academy,Atria Shopping Gallery

Register Robotic Workshop  HERE


Shah Alam Robotic Class is back!

Little Botz Academy will organize robotic class at shah alam since lots of request asking for robotic class at shah alam area from our customer.

There will be two stages of robotic class offered for your children to learn and explore. Details of the class as below.

Registration fee *RM75* is compulsory to all.

Register here

Hurry up and book your seat.
Seat are limited. Registration close on 5th August.

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Announcement : Robotic Membership Registration is Open now!

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Science and technology are extremely popular with today’s children and youth; they are also a pathway to career opportunities in the future. Engaging in technology activities when young can help to stimulate interest in those fields, develop mastery of necessary technologies, and energize the classroom.

Our little botz will be equipped with STEM knowledge and creative problem-solving skills that is necessary to be innovative and creative thinkers.
We seek to create environments where learning happens in a hands-on and motivational way.

Not every kid may move on to become a dedicated hobbyist who creates original mechanical projects, but all of them can benefit from the skills they will learn with educational robotic kits.

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PLEASE SIGN ME UP!


Robot dad: I built a smartphone bot to spend time with my kids

Divorce can be a painful experience, especially when it means one parent doesn’t see as much of their kids as they used to.

When divorcee Matt Walker met his future second wife in the US, he knew things would only get worse for him spending time with his two boys, Jarvis, 9 and Maxi, 7.

That’s why he built the RambleBot.

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Matt Walker is Robot Dad. Photo: Matt Walker

It looks like a miniature white tank but instead of a cannon it has an arm with a gripper. There’s a smartphone holder at the top where Matt’s face appears.
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From his home in San Jose, California — where he lives with his current wife and seven-month-old son Jack — Matt logs into the RambleBot that lives at his ex wife’s house 11,410 kilometres away in Brisbane, Australia, and hangs out with his sons, controlling the robot with an app and talking via Skype. He’s done this every other day for the last three years.

The robot has a big battery which lasts about two days. The smartphone battery runs out faster, so Matt adds a battery extender case. When the RambleBot is plugged in, it will charge the phone.

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Matt Walker Skyping his son Jarvis as the RambleBot. Photo: Matt Walker

Matt acknowledges the unusual set-up may have its critics because it’s essentially parenting at a distance.

“What’s he [my son] going to tell his psychoanalyst in the future — my father was a tiny little robot?” Matt jokes.

“Telepresence will never be as good as being there in real life. READ MORE.